Mrs B Kirk – DT Lead

At Liskeard Hillfort, we recognise the huge impact that creators and designers have upon our lives. We think it is hugely important that our children understand the process of designing and creating as well as having the skills to be able to design, create and evaluate themselves.

So often, children are directed to make a specific item with the whole class making exactly the same thing. Not at Hillfort! Whilst our children will go through the same skills training and design process, their finished products will be their own. We believe that in our ever-changing world, creativity and problem-solving is at the forefront of every CEO’s interview checklist.  When studying design and technology at Hillfort, we hope to ignite the creative spark in each child!

As well as fostering creativity, our Design and Technology curriculum ensures that children learn and practise the key skills needed for successful production. This includes the skills of:

  • sewing  e.g. threading a needle, starting off and finishing, different stitches;
  • cooking e.g. peeling, chopping, grating, mixing, blending, baking, boiling, nutrition;
  • cutting, shaping and attaching e.g. selecting cutting tools, using tabs, different gluing methods;
  • linking e.g. cams, pulleys;
  • strengthening e.g. choice of material, strengthening, stiffening, reinforcing.

In addition to acquiring these tangible skills, we aim to develop children’s resilience and problem solving – the building blocks for success. Self-reflectiveness, collaboration, focus, imagination and inspiration are not optional skills; they are fundamental to success.

We cannot imagine the advances in technology the children at Liskeard Hillfort with live through in their lives. However, we can provide them with the skills and attributes that they need to triumph.

Long Term Planning

Hillfort Specific

Cultural Isolation
Children at Hillfort may not be as familiar with different cultures as more multicultural locations.
Economic Isolation
Children at Hillfort may not have experienced some of the most current up to date technology that children in more cosmopolitan areas have.
Closing the vocabulary gap
There is a vocabulary gap at Hillfort that is being addressed. Children need to understand the words that they are using.
Oracy and articulating own opinions
Children at Hillfort need to practice articulating and justifying their own opinions and thoughts.

Design Technology Concepts

Creative, technical and practical expertise
Children need to perform everyday tasks confidently and participate successfully in an ever increasing technological world.
Build and apply
Children need technological knowledge, understanding and skills to create high-quality prototypes and products.
Critique, evaluate and test
Children need to be able to test theirs, and others, ideas and products.
Principles of nutrition
Children need to understand and apply the principles of nutrition and learn how to cook.
Consequence and impact
Children need to understand how technology has changed our lives and that people lived before there was the technology that they use today.

Design Technology Skills

Designing Skills
Understanding contexts, users and purposes
Children will use design criteria completing background research to support them where appropriate. They will be able to describe features of their work, who their work is designed for and how it works.
Generating, developing, modelling and communicating ideas
Children will generate ideas based on their own experiences, needs of the user and research.
Making Skills
Planning
Children will be able to order the stages of making, select appropriate tools and equipment and explain their choices.
Practical skills and techniques
Children will use a wide range of equipment and materials to help them: measure, mark out, cut, shape, assemble, join, combine and finish with increasing accuracy.
Evaluating Skills
Own ideas and products
Children will evaluate their own ideas and products against their design criteria.
Existing products
Children will investigate how well existing products have been designed and made and whether they are fit for purpose.
Key events and individuals
In KS2, children will know about inventors, designers, engineers, chefs and manufacturers who have developed ground-breaking products.
Technical Knowledge
Making products work
Children will know that materials are chosen because of their functional and aesthetic qualities. They will be able to use the correct technical vocabulary.
Cooking and Nutrition
Where food comes from
Children will know that food is grown, reared and caught in the UK, Europe and the wider world. They will know that seasons can affect the availability of food.
Food preparation, cooking and nutrition
Children will know how to prepare a variety of dishes and that food and drink are needed to provide energy for the body.

Curriculum Maps:

Product User Purpose

Reception
Hunting for structures – EYFSDesign, make and evaluate a strong wall for humpty dumpty for sitting on safely. (construction kit)
Going on a joint hunt – MechanismsDesign, make and evaluate a class storybook for the other Reception class about their interests and hobbies.
TextilesDesign, make and evaluate a picnic blanket for the three little bears to take on a picnic with Goldilocks.
FoodDesign, make and evaluate a fruit salad for themselves for a class picnic.
Year 1
Covid catch up (yr R topic)Design, make and evaluate a strong wall for humpty dumpty for sitting on safely. (construction kit)
Mechanisms – Wheels and AxlesDesign, make and evaluate a trolley/wheelbarrow for a character in a story to carry vegetables in from the field.
Structures – Free standing structuresDesign, make and evaluate a chair for a teddy to sit on. (reinforcing materials, strengthening materials etc)
TextilesDesign, make and evaluate some class bunting for a summer picnic for Dr Cook.
Food – Preparing fruit and vegetablesDesign, make and evaluate a fruit kebab for their friends to eat at sports day.
Year 2
Mechanisms – Sliders and leversDesign, make and evaluate a greetings card for a family member for Christmas.
Food – Preparing fruit and vegetablesDesign, make and evaluate a healthy fruit smoothie for their peers to celebrate healthy eating and a healthy lifestyle.
StructuresDesign, make and evaluate a kite for themselves to fly on the school field.
Textiles – Templates and joining techniquesDesign, make and evaluate a glove puppet to perform a play for the children in reception.
Basic sewing stitch
Year 3
Mechanical Systems – Levers and linkagesDesign, make and evaluate a moving card for a younger pupil to give them information about insects.
Eg. moving pictures of bees to flowers, butterflies to flowers etc.
StructuresDesign, make and evaluate a desk tidy for themselves to use in the classroom.
Mechanical systems – PneumaticsDesign, make and evaluate a pneumatic toy for a friend for their birthday present.
Design a monster/beast to protect the classroom??
Textiles – covid catch up y2 topicTime to practice and consolidate sewing techniques.
Design, make and evaluate a glove puppet to perform a play for the children in reception.
Basic sewing stitch.
Electrical systemsDesign, make and evaluate a night light for themselves or a younger sibling to help them get to sleep at night.
Children will need a very basic understanding of electrical circuits.
Food – Healthy and varied dietDesign, make and evaluate a healthy wrap for themselves for a picnic (school trip?)
Year 4
Covid catch up – levers and linkagesDesign, make and evaluate a birthday card to celebrate the birthday of a friend or family member.
Structures – Shell structuresDesign, make and evaluate a gift box for a friend or family member for a Christmas present.
Mechanical systems – PneumaticsMighty mascots.
Design, make and evaluate a moving mascot for their class for sports day.
FoodDesign, make and evaluate a healthy dip for guests at a party.
Textiles – 2D shape to 3D productDesign, make and evaluate a purse or wallet for a family member to use and keep their money safe.
Electrical SystemsSimple circuits and switches (including programming and control)
Year 5
Covid catch up – levers and linkagesDesign, make and evaluate a Halloween card for Halloween for a friend.
FoodDesign, make and evaluate a festive ginger biscuit to give away at Christmas.
MechanismsDesign, make and evaluate a sign with a message for a chosen audience to remind them about something.
Ie, a moving picture of rubbish going into a bin to remind the public to recycle.
Textiles – Covid catch up – Y4 topicDesign, make and evaluate a purse or wallet for a family member to use and keep their money safe.
Structures – Frame structureDesign, make and evaluate a bird hide for a bird watcher.
Electrical Systems – Monitoring and controlCrumble
Develop a design specification for a product that responds automatically to environmental changes in the environment.
Generate and communicate ideas through annotated sketches and representations of electrical circuits or circuit diagrams.
Using a step-by-step plan, select and accurately assemble materials, electrical components, to produce a functional product.
Create and modify a computer control program to enable their electrical product to respond to changes in the environment.
Year 6
Covid catch up – levers and linkagesDesign, make and evaluate a card for a chosen purpose for a chosen audience.
Textiles – Combining different fabric shapes including CADDesign, make and evaluate a fabric advent calendar for themselves to celebrate the Christmas season.
Mechanical Systems – Pulleys, gears or cams/Design, make and evaluate a moving toy for a shop window display in a toy shop.
StructuresDesign, make and evaluate a marble run game for themselves to play with during golden time.
Electrical systems – Alarming vehiclesDesign, make and evaluate a car which is alarmed to prevent theft for a parent/teacher.
Food – Celebrating culture and seasonalityDesign, make and evaluate a savoury biscuit for parents for parents’ evening.

Famous people:

Children should know a range of inventors, what they are famous for and what made them become successful.

Famous chef: Paul Ainsworth
  1. Who they are? Chef in Padstow
  2. What they are famous for? Head chef at a restaurant, famous for using local produce and what is in season. 
  3. What made them successful? chef

Famous designer: Charles Worth
  1. Who they are? first ‘fashion designer’ in the 19th Century
  2. What they are famous for? English fashion designer who created dresses for individuals.
  3. What made them successful? He was popular – he made outfits in France and previously outfits had just been bought by people but he would make them to fit his client in a material chosen by them.

Charles Worth

Famous inventor: Garrett Morgan
  1. Who they are?
  2. What they are famous for? Designing a revamped sewing machine which meant clothes could be manufactured quickly. 
  3. What made them successful?

Famous engineers: Isambard Kingdom Brunel / Stephen Sauveste

Children should explore some famous engineers who have made strong structures – Isambard Kingdom Brunel, possibly Stephen Sauveste who designed the Eiffel Tower.

  1. Who they are?
  2. What they are famous for?
  3. What made them successful?

Famous chef: Heston Blumenthal
  1. Who they are?
  2. What they are famous for? Famous Chef known for adapting recipes and being a quirky cook. 
  3. What made them successful? Three Michelin stars (one of only five restaurants in the UK)

Famous inventor: Benjamin Franklin
  1. Who they are ? started exploring electricity in 1746
  2. What they are famous for ? He did lots of experiments and investigations about static electricity.
  3. What made them successful? He was the first to label ‘positive’ and ‘negative’ charge.

Famous inventor: Lewis Urry
  1. Who they are? Canadian
  2. What they are famous for? Chemical Engineer and inventor
  3. What made them successful?  Invented the alkaline and lithium battery.

Famous designer: Elspeth Champcommunal
  1. Who they are?
  2. What they are famous for? British fasion designer during the war and first editor of British Vogue magazine. 
  3. What made them successful? Designing clothes that could be made by people at home to keep spirits up during the war. This meant clothes without extra pockets, pleats and turn-ups as these were deemed too extravagant.

Structural Project - Year 6

Windmill – based on the book ‘The boy who harnessed the wind’.

Creating a waterproof, strong structure that moves water based on a cross-curricular topic on the ‘Boy who harnessed the wind’.

Inventor: William Kampwamba

  1. Who they are? At the time a 14 year old boy from Malawi whose family couldn’t afford to send him to school. He read books from the library about electricity and made a windmill in his village.
  2. What they are famous for? Designing and making a windmill that would give electricity to his house and help water the crops and provide water for his village.
  3. What made them successful? In the height of a drought in Malawi, William saw a need and made a windmill. He powered a small lamp in his bedroom to begin with, then his house and whole village. The houses in the village are also able to pump water for the village’s fields and houses.